Friday, March 31, 2006

Corbett tiger deaths could be due to poisoning

March 28, 2006

By Gyan Varma, Indo-Asian News Service

New Delhi, March 28 (IANS) Four female Royal Bengal tigresses have died, including two this month, at the Jim Corbett National Park in Uttaranchal, and Project Tiger officials suspect two of them could have been poisoned.


The deaths over the past two months prompted officials to send a special team to the park. Two of the victims were pubs.

'I suspect the two female tiger cubs could have been poisoned by villagers in the area,' Rajesh Gopal, director of Project Tiger, told IANS.

The two cubs were found dead - one on Feb 26 and the other March 7 - at Dhela in the 1,200-sq km national park in the Himalayan foothills.

Gopal, who was part of the Project Tiger and Wildlife Institute of India team that went to study the deaths, said the place where the cubs were found dead lay very close to human habitation.

The probe team felt there was a possibility they had been poisoned.

'The post-mortem report does not clearly state the cause of the death. But the deaths were certainly not due to poaching,' said Gopal. 'There is a 50 percent chance that the cubs died due to poisoning.'

He did not rule out the possibility of the cubs being killed by other big cats as there were a sizeable number of tigers in the area.

The tiger reserve, the oldest in the country, is home to over 140 tigers (2004 census) and 90 leopards besides many other animals and bird species.

Referring to the deaths of the other adult tigresses, on Jan 8 and March 17, he said rumours that a male killed them during mating were not true.

Gopal said that such explanations were difficult to believe.

'Though cases of deaths due to fighting between male and female tigers is not uncommon, in these deaths we did not find any evidence to substantiate the theory that these tigresses had died due to violent mating,' he said.

Gopal added the rumours were due to 'misreporting' by some local dailies.

The Jan 8 tigress' death occurred at Bijrani. A day earlier park officials had observed that the animal was not well.

'The forest officials gave her meat but she refused to eat it. They found her dead the next day,' he said.

The March 17 death was observed on the outskirts of the reserve at Ram Nagar.

According to Gopal, the medical report on the tigresses' death was not available yet.

Copyright Indo-Asian News Service

http://www.dailyindia.com/show/12234.php/
Corbett_tiger_deaths_could_be_due_to_poisoning

For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL 33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457
http://www.bigcatrescue.org/ MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org
Sign our petition here:
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431
Corbett tiger deaths could be due to poisoning

March 28, 2006

By Gyan Varma, Indo-Asian News Service

New Delhi, March 28 (IANS) Four female Royal Bengal tigresses have died, including two this month, at the Jim Corbett National Park in Uttaranchal, and Project Tiger officials suspect two of them could have been poisoned.


The deaths over the past two months prompted officials to send a special team to the park. Two of the victims were pubs.

'I suspect the two female tiger cubs could have been poisoned by villagers in the area,' Rajesh Gopal, director of Project Tiger, told IANS.

The two cubs were found dead - one on Feb 26 and the other March 7 - at Dhela in the 1,200-sq km national park in the Himalayan foothills.

Gopal, who was part of the Project Tiger and Wildlife Institute of India team that went to study the deaths, said the place where the cubs were found dead lay very close to human habitation.

The probe team felt there was a possibility they had been poisoned.

'The post-mortem report does not clearly state the cause of the death. But the deaths were certainly not due to poaching,' said Gopal. 'There is a 50 percent chance that the cubs died due to poisoning.'

He did not rule out the possibility of the cubs being killed by other big cats as there were a sizeable number of tigers in the area.

The tiger reserve, the oldest in the country, is home to over 140 tigers (2004 census) and 90 leopards besides many other animals and bird species.

Referring to the deaths of the other adult tigresses, on Jan 8 and March 17, he said rumours that a male killed them during mating were not true.

Gopal said that such explanations were difficult to believe.

'Though cases of deaths due to fighting between male and female tigers is not uncommon, in these deaths we did not find any evidence to substantiate the theory that these tigresses had died due to violent mating,' he said.

Gopal added the rumours were due to 'misreporting' by some local dailies.

The Jan 8 tigress' death occurred at Bijrani. A day earlier park officials had observed that the animal was not well.

'The forest officials gave her meat but she refused to eat it. They found her dead the next day,' he said.

The March 17 death was observed on the outskirts of the reserve at Ram Nagar.

According to Gopal, the medical report on the tigresses' death was not available yet.

Copyright Indo-Asian News Service

http://www.dailyindia.com/show/12234.php/
Corbett_tiger_deaths_could_be_due_to_poisoning

For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL 33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457
http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org
Sign our petition here:
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431
Leopard in a spot

By: Nimesh Dave
March 31, 2006

It took committed officials from the Sanjay Gandhi National Park around 90 minutes to rescue a female leopard trapped in a well in Kaman village on the Ahmedabad-Bhiwandi highway. Nimesh Dave reports

At 4 am on Thursday, when some girls from Kaman village, around 40 km from Mumbai on the Ahmedabad-Bhiwandi highway, reached the village well to get water for their daily chores, they found a female leopard trying to make its way out of the 18-foot-deep well.

They immediately ran home to tell their parents who in turn informed the village sarpanch. The sarpanch waited for daylight and then called the Vasai police station to inform them about the animal.

The cops called the Vasai fire station for help. At 1.30 pm, firemen arrived. But when their efforts to rescue the leopard failed, forest officials of the Sanjay Gandhi National Park were called in. The officials arrived by 1.50 pm and pulled the leopard back to safety.

2.30 pm
Help arrives: Forest officials throw a cot in the well, in the hope that the leopard would jump onto it and could then be pulled to safety. The animal still refused to cooperate, hence the officials then tied a noose around its belly and tranquilised it

2.45 pm
Dum laga ke haiya: After 15 minutes, when the animal fell unconscious, it was pulled out

3 pm
In transit: The three-and-a-half year old rescued animal was then taken to the forest department van

3.10 pm
Back home: At 3.10 pm, the leopard was released into the national park, safe and sound

Thursday, March 30, 2006

Snow Leopard DNA studies

DNA analysis at the University of Idaho may strip some of the secrets from Central Asia’s elusive snow leopard, wildlife biologists say.

UI wildlife professor Lisette Waits’ use of DNA analysis on hair and scat samples from the rare cats apparently will be the first time the technique has been applied to snow leopards, which typically show little genetic variation among their population groups.

Waits worked with colleagues at Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo and the National Institutes of Health to develop the new tool. She gained an international profile for her work on bears in Europe and later on grizzlies in the Rocky Mountains.

Waits said DNA analysis will help scientists to better estimate snow leopard numbers.

“I am really excited to provide new tools that will aid in the conservation and management of this threatened species,” said Waits.

Waits worked in cooperation with Warren Johnson of the NIH Laboratory of Genomic Diversity in Maryland to identify repeating sections of DNA called microsatellite loci. Geneticists use data from microsatellite loci for DNA fingerprints and individual identification.

Using genetic samples provided by Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo, these geneticists tested more than 50 snow leopard loci, and 10 have shown the degree of variability needed to make the technique successful for the species.

Conservation scientists now will be able to test field collected specimens, such as feces and shed hairs, to identify individuals or determine sex.

The Snow Leopard Trust has sent 85 fecal samples to the UI for genetic assessment. These samples were collected in Kyrgyzstan and China in conjunction with trap camera and sign surveys. The three techniques will be evaluated to compare what level of information they each provide on snow leopard numbers.

Waits expects results by summer that will be shared with snow leopard conservationists around the world.

http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/519230/

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

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Thursday, March 23, 2006

Five tiger deaths in Uttaranchal in two months

India: Five tiger deaths in Uttaranchal in two months

[ Thursday, March 23, 2006 10:20:44 amIANS ]

 

 

RSS Feeds| SMS NEWS to 8888 for latest updates

 

LUCKNOW: A spate of tiger deaths at the Corbett National Park and the adjoining Rajaji National Park in Uttaranchal has raised concerns among wildlife experts.

 

As many as four tigers were found dead over the past two months at Corbett, India's oldest wildlife reserve and home to about 140 tigers. Another tiger was reportedly mauled by an elephant at the Rajaji park about six weeks ago.

 

Four of the five dead tigers were females.

 

After almost two months since the first death was reported, wildlife officials sprung into action Tuesday. A team of experts rushed from the Indian wildlife institute at Dehradun to the Corbett Park.

 

The carcass of the last tiger, which reportedly died Friday, was discovered Monday in the Ramnagar forest range in the outer periphery of Corbett. Officials attributed the deaths to infighting or physically incompatible mating.

 

“Three of the four female victims were apparently killed fighting its rivals while one died as a result of mating with a much heavier and bigger male," Uttaranchal chief wildlife conservator S.K. Chandola told.

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1460430.cms

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Monday, March 20, 2006

Saki Naka Police Nabs Carrier with LEOPARD Skin Worth Rs 25,000

Saki Naka Police Nabs Carrier with LEOPARD Skin Worth Rs 25,000

 

By Staff Reporter

 

Last week after the Varanasi blasts during the 'nakabandi' arrangement by Sakinaka Police, they chanced upon an auto rickshaw which was transporting a Leopard skin by a carrier meant for trading.

 

PSI Kadam who was manning the check post near Saki Naka said, “The person traveling in the auto appeared suspicious, we questioned him but he was giving vague answers. We then searched his belongings to find the leopard skin hidden in his personal belongings.”

 

The carrier Dhananjay Ramchandra Lambar (19) was carrying this leopard skin worth Rs 25,000 to an unknown contact in Bail Bazar in Kurla. He said I was told to meet somebody at a point and handover him the parcel.

 

Sr. PI Khandagle of Saki Naka police told Planet Powai that the carrier Dhananjay was in possession of a banned wild life skin and has been arrested under Wildlife Protection Act of 1972, section 50 (2), 51 and send to police remand for fifteen days. Interrogation of the accused did not reveal any source or destination contact of the larger nexus in this illegal trade of banned animal skin.

 

Police is also getting in touch with forest officials to establish any clue in their knowledge about any poaching incident in the National Forest. Investigations are going on in the case and police is yet to crack the gang operating in this area

 

http://www.planetpowai.com/news%5C19032006003.html

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Saturday, March 18, 2006

3 held in city with tiger skin

3 held in city with tiger skin 

 

Express News Service

 

Lucknow, March 18: The city police on Saturday claimed to have busted a gang of poachers with the arrest of three persons. The police recovered a tiger cub skin from them.

 

The arrested trio has been identified as Ashish Kumar Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar Tiwari (both from Gorakhpur), and Radhey Shyam Chaturvedi, a resident of Ballia.

 

 

 

Police said the gang’s kingpin, Nilesh Singh, is still absconding, adding that Radhey Shyam is a hardcore criminal and had eight cases of murder and loot registered against him.

 

Police said besides killing deer and cubs in the forests of Siddhatnagar and selling skins in the international market, the gang was also involved in smuggling of Asthadhatu idols.

 

“Two member of the gang arrested on February 6 had told us that their other accomplices would be here this month. We laid a trap and arrested them,” SO (Gomti Nagar) Manoj Kumar Pant said.

 

http://cities.expressindia.com/fullstory.php?newsid=174192

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Snow leopard skins confiscated in Mongolia

Snow leopard skins confiscated in Mongolia

 

The endangered snow leopard is threatened by habitat loss and poaching.

 

 

16 Mar 2006

Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia – A WWF-supported anti-poaching unit in western Mongolia arrested a man for possession of four snow leopard skins, three of which were still wet from recent kills.

 

“There is an illegal trade network of leopard skins here in Mongolia,” said Yo Onon, a species officer with the WWF Mongolia Programme Office. “We are trying to put a stop to this illegal trade.”

 

The threats facing snow leopards include habitat fragmentation and uncontrolled hunting, especially as demand for their pelts and other body parts is high. Although it is difficult to assess the present-day scale of trade, snow leopard hunting has been reported from most central Asian range States and the Russian Federation since political and economic instability was ushered in by the dissolution of the Soviet Union at the beginning of the 1990s.

 

In 2004, two people were found in Mongolia selling 17 snow leopard skins across the border with Kazakhstan. According to WWF, 5–7 snow leopard skins are sold annually in Mongolia's western provinces in the Altai-Sayan ecoregion.

 

“The transboudary trade of snow leopard skins is relatively easy as there are poor customs and border checks,” Onon added.

 

Although protected under national and international law, the snow leopard (Uncia uncia) remains a highly endangered species, with only about 4,500–7,350 found throughout a range of 12 countries – Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. The population in Mongolia is estimated at 1,000–1,500.

 

For more information:

Tuyachimeg, Communications Officer

WWF Mongolia

E-mail: tuyachimeg@wwf.mn

 

Joanna Benn, Commucations Officer

WWF Global Species Programme

Tel: +39 06 84 497 212

E-mail: jbenn@wwfspecies.org

 

http://www.panda.org/news_facts/newsroom/index.cfm?uNewsID=63800

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Thursday, March 16, 2006

Seven held for possessing and selling tiger skins, idols

Seven held for possessing and selling tiger skins, idols

Patna: Seven persons have been arrested for possessing and trying to sell tiger skins and ancient idols worth nearly Rs 10 crore during a late night operation here, police said today.

 

The seven were arrested late last night from a hotel on Ashok Rajpath here and four tiger skins and five asthadhatu (an alloy of eight metals) idols seized from them, Superintendent of police (city) Vikas Vaibhav told reporters.

 

On being tipped off about the presence of the smugglers at the hotel, a police team, posing as buyers, tried to strike a deal with them.

 

During the the course of negotiations, the smugglers displayed the goods including the tiger skins, the idols of various Hindu gods and a stone idol of Buddha. The police then arrested all seven of them and seized the items.

 

"Some of those arrested are from Patna and others belong to Nawada," he said.

 

http://www.newkerala.com/news2.php?action=fullnews&id=26496

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Villagers hunt rare species of leopard

Villagers hunt rare species of leopard

 

Staff Correspondent

 

Villagers hunted a leopard of rare species (pantherar pardus) at Chakaria upazila in Cox's Bazar on March 7 night.

A forest official said a local union parishad chairman incited the villagers to kill the leopard, which is now on the verge of extinction.

 

 

"No such act of human insensibility on wildlife without any reason did take place in the last few decades since independence," said divisional forest officer Dr Tapan Kumar Dey, also project director of Dulahazra Safari Park.

 

He said they might seek government permission to sue the chairman for his act.

 

The leopard, seven-foot long, 2.5 feet height and weighing 60 kgs, fell victim to the attack of villagers when it emerged a shrimp enclosure at Pashchim (west) Baro Bheola village under Chakaria upazila from the neighbouring forest on March 7 night.

 

 

As news of the leopard's appearance spread hundreds of villagers had encircled the shrimp enclosure and beat it dead before the forest officials came the spot, sources said.

 

 

Local people said they were forced to kill the leopard as it attacked two workers of the shrimp enclosure.

 

Later, Wildlife Management and Nature Conservation (WMNC) Department officials with the help of police recovered the slain leopard and conserved it in the Natural History Museum of the Safari Park at Dulahazara, sources said.

 

 

Dr Tapan said three, out of ten species of tigers, leopards and cats are extinct in the country in the last three decades. The rest seven species are also critically endangered in the country.

 

"The leopard killed by the marauding villagers belonged to one of the extinct species. This species are now found only in a very few hilly and impenetrable forests of Sylhet, Garopahar in Mymensingh, Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts," he said.

 

 

Wildlife expert Prof Quazi Zakir Hossain and Bangladesh Wildlife Trust Executive Secretary Dr Anwarul Islam expressed shock at the killing of this rare leopard. They urged all to inform the authorities concerned immediately if any such wild animal, particularly those of extinct species, appeared in any locality.

 

 

http://www.thedailystar.net/2006/03/15/d603153503120.htm

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Monday, March 13, 2006

Record number of lynx believed to be in Finland's forests

Record number of lynx believed to be in Finland's forests

Scientists adopt Swedish model: number of individual lynx counted from footprints in snow

 

This winter there is a record number - between 1,150 to 2,000 - of lynx in the Finnish forests.

      According to the headcount taken in the province of Savo in the east of the country, there are up to twice as many lynx in Finland as had been previously believed.

      The number of lynx inhabiting six game preservation society areas was estimated by using a counting method adopted from Sweden.

      The pilot project was carried out by the Southern and Northern Savo Game Preservation Societies, in cooperation with the Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute (RKTL).

      Savo was chosen for the area’s relatively high lynx population, the densest in the country. A new counting method was experimented with, as - along with the sense that there were a growing number of lynx in the area - the old method has been found to be too inaccurate.

      

In Sweden, the lynx population sizes have been estimated based on the animals’ footmarks in snow since the late 1990s. With the introduction of the method, the estimations there have become more precise.

      Presently, the size of the Swedish lynx population is estimated at 1,800, instead of 20 to 30 percent less, as was previously thought.

      In Finland the footprint count was carried out for the first time on Saturday. In one day, the headcount of lynx was taken simultaneously in various southern and northern Savo municipalities. Hundreds of hunters from local clubs took part in the effort.

      Attempts were made to eliminate possible overlapping in sightings. In the communities of Juva and Rantasalmi, for one, the headcounts for lynx were estimated at 44 and 30 animals respectively. This is 50 percent more than what has been thought previously.

     

The final calculation results will be determined after cross-referencing the game preservation societies’ numbers with those by the local contact persons who monitor predators.

      If the method is found to be more accurate than the ones used before, it will be adopted in other parts of the country as well in the coming years.

      “But we still need to introduce other new counting methods as well, such as aerial observation, to further sharpen the number”, researcher Samuli Heikkinen from RKTL points out.

      There are plans to map out the entire lynx and wolf populations of Eastern Finland next winter. The lynx, with its distinctive tufted ears, is the only wild cat indigenous to Finland.

 

 

Previously in HS International Edition:

  Helsinki is urban but teeming with wildlife (1.6.2004)

 

Links:

  The lynx in Finland (data from 2001)

  Eurasian Lynx (Lynx Lynx)

 

http://www.hs.fi/english/article/Record+number+of+lynx+believed+to+be+in+Finlands+forests+/1135219125573

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

India takes on poachers in key tiger reserve

India takes on poachers in key tiger reserve

13 Mar 2006 14:50:18 GMT

 

Source: Reuters

 

Background  CRISIS PROFILE: What is the conflict in Kashmir about?

 

By Bappa Majumdar

 

CANNING, India, March 13 (Reuters) - Authorities in eastern India have arrested 30 poachers in the world's largest tiger reserve this year against 40 caught in 2004 and 2005, officials said on Monday.

 

They said the sharp jump in arrests in the first nine weeks of 2006 were largely the result of border troops joining wildlife personnel in tackling poachers in the Sunderbans, a vast mangrove forest home to scores of Royal Bengal tigers.

 

"Joint patrolling and vigilance between us and the Border Security Force has added muscle to the anti-poaching efforts," Pradeep Vyas, director of the Sunderbans Tiger Reserve, said in Canning, the closest large town to the reserve.

 

India's Border Security Force (BSF) troops are working with authorities in West Bengal state and patrolling the sparsely populated Sunderbans -- criss-crossed by hundreds of channels -- by boat and on foot.

 

BSF troops have joined wildlife guards in five camps in the Sunderbans to boost the anti-poaching drive, including on a mangrove forest island where the Bay of Bengal meets the reserve's outer fringes, Vyas said.

 

A single tiger can fetch up $50,000 on the black market, where its organs and bones are sold for use in traditional Chinese medicine.

 

India has stepped up protection across its 28 tiger reserves after the federal government was slammed following reports poachers had killed the entire tiger population of up to 18 tigers in the Sariska reserve in western India.

 

Tigers experts said the situation could be similar in other sanctuaries.

 

A century ago, there were about 40,000 big cats in India but now officials estimate there are at most 3,600. Environmental groups say the figure could be as low as 2,000.

 

The last census in 2003 estimated there were between 260 and 280 tigers in the Indian part of the Sunderbans.

 

The marshy region, part of which extends into neighbouring Bangladesh, is also home to salt-water crocodiles and rare river dolphins and covers 350 sq km (135 sq miles).

 

West Bengal officials say poachers are a major threat to wildlife guards and there have been frequent gunbattles.

 

"They are armed and do not hesitate to exchange fire with our men," Vyas said.

 

The nature of the land also makes it easy for poachers to operate.

 

"They hide in creeks and sneak into the core (sanctuary) area under cover of darkness," said S.R. Banerjee, the director of global nature conservation body, WWF, in West Bengal.

 

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/B152612.htm

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

Sunday, March 12, 2006

Leopard kills child in Kashmir, India

Leopard kills child in Kashmir

 

March 09, 2006

 

 

SRINAGAR, India (UPI) -- A leopard has killed a 7-year-old girl in Kashmir, dragging her into the forest by the neck as she came out of her home, local officials said. 

 

The child, identified as Rubina Bano, had gone outdoors Wednesday night to relieve herself when the beast attacked, the New Kerala News reported. Her family members and other villagers ran after the leopard, but it disappeared into the forest.

 

The badly mauled body was recovered in the forest Thursday morning.

 

The incident occurred in Bhagla village in Doda district, the officials said, and had caused panic in the area.

 

Leopards have killed four people in Indian Kashmir since December, police said.

 

They are more likely to attack in winter, coming down from the high mountains in search of food.

 

The animals are protected, but police and wildlife officials will shoot them if they threaten human life.

 

There are about 14,000 leopards in India, but poachers are causing their numbers to fall, as their pelts are highly prized.

 

http://www.dailyindia.com/show/6009.php/Leopard-kills-child-in-Kashmir

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431