Thursday, June 29, 2006

China's Wealth Fuels Appetite for Exotic Animal Products

China's Wealth Fuels Appetite for Exotic Animal Products

By Mil Arcega

Washington

29 June 2006

 

 

 

Endangered pangolin

A recent survey by U.S. and Chinese conservation groups shows fewer Chinese diners are eating owls, civets and other wild animals due to fears of contracting animal-borne diseases. However, as Mil Arcega reports, despite changing attitudes, the market for wild animal products is growing.

 

 

 

Customs officials at Bangkok International Airport in Thailand this week seized 60 wooden crates bound for Laos and China. Inside, they found several dozen small turtles along with 245 pangolins, an endangered, scaly, ant-eating animal.  Schwann Tunhikorn, Thailand's deputy director of National Parks and Wildlife, said some of the pangolins appeared unhealthy.

 

 

 

 

Schwann Tunhikorn

"They have been put into these sacks as you can see, and their movement was restricted and they are not in very good condition,” he said. “We try as fast as possible to take them to the wildlife breeding center at Ratchaburi where we have a big pen so we can release them and feed them.”

 

 

 

Pangolins are a prized delicacy in China and Vietnam where a five-kilogram animal can sell for as much as $13,000. The Chinese believe the meat is highly nutritious and prescribe the scales to breast-feeding mothers and asthma sufferers.

 

 

 

 

 

Although a new survey conducted by China's Wildlife Conservation Association says consumption of wild animals has decreased 40 percent in parts of China, deputy director Zhao Shengli says they remain status symbols among the wealthy.

 

 

 

 

Zhao Shengli

 

"They consume wildlife to ensure that other people know how rich they are," he said. "Consumers in China are not as pragmatic as those in the U.S.  This abnormal idea of consumption is a bad phenomenon in the development of the Chinese economy."

 

 

 

Fewer restaurants are serving wild animals since the outbreak of avian flu and SARS or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Still, the survey shows the wholesale market for wild animal products has grown more than 20 percent.

 

 

 

 

Trent Steve

"We encourage the Chinese people, with all their great wisdom and ingenuity, to take the lead globally, to show people and nations what must be done, and how to do it," said Trent Steve, president of Wild Aid, a group dedicated to fighting illegal animal trafficking.

 

 

 

Wild Aid says the use of bear parts in traditional Chinese medicine is one reason why most bear species are declining around the world. Eighty different varieties of wild animals were found in Chinese markets during the survey, including a number of endangered species.

 

http://www.voanews.com/english/2006-06-29-voa47.cfm

Afhanistan Preserves for Leopards

U.S. group launches effort to establish wildlife reserves in Afghanistan(Updated 05:28 p.m.)

 

 

2006/6/29

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP)

 

 

 

A conservation group said Thursday it is launching an effort to establish wildlife reserves in war-torn Afghanistan, where conservationist efforts have largely been sidelined by the government's long-running battle with the Taliban.

 

The program by the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society or WCS, will consider establishing reserves in five areas, including the Pamir-I-Buzurg, Little Pamir, and the Waghjir Valley, all located in the mountainous far northeastern handle of the country, and Bande Amir and Ajar Valley, located in the central plateau region.

 

 

The project will include a three-year biodiversity project to review government environmental policies, develop a database of existing wildlife populations and set up a wildlife monitoring program, the WCS said in a statement.

 

 

"This is an important and exciting moment for Afghanistan, which contains some of the most beautiful wild lands in Asia," Peter Zahler, Assistant Director for WCS Asia Program and a researcher in the region for over a decade, said in the statement.

 

 

The project will be funded by the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with the government of Afghanistan, the statement said.

 

 

"Conservation is critical for recovery and stability in a country where so many people directly depend on local natural resources for their survival," Zahler said. "Conservation can also inspire local communities and even neighboring countries to work together to protect the regions natural heritage."

 

 

Afghanistan's natural landscape is dominated by the Hindu Kush mountain range and the Pamir Knot, a region where the Hindu Kush, Karakoram, Tien Shan, and Himalayan ranges come together to form some of the greatest mountains in the world.

 

 

The WCS said the ecosystems support a wide range of large mammal species, including the Marco Polo sheep, the world's largest. Other mammals found in Afghanistan include the ibex, the Persian leopard, gazelles, and the elusive snow leopard.

 

 

"Conserving Afghanistan's unique biological diversity is an important element of U.S. Agency for International Development's overall reconstruction program in the country," said Alonzo Fulgham, USAID's Mission Director in Afghanistan, in the statement.

 

http://www.chinapost.com.tw/i_latestdetail.asp?id=39359

Wednesday, June 28, 2006

India's wildlife gives common cause to China, Dalai Lama

New Delhi, June 28. (UNI): China and the Dalai Lama have found a common cause in working against trade in wildlife parts, much to India's comfort.

Following a request from India for help in curbing wildlife crime, China has banned use of animal parts in its traditional medicines.

The Dalai Lama has also issued an appeal to his followers against killing wildlife for making robes, a status symbol in Tibet.

"The Chinese response has been very encouraging, and its ban on the use of animal parts in its medicine would discourage wildlife smuggling to that country through Tibet," secretary Environment Pradipto Ghosh told reporters here.

Besides, the Chinese Government has banned trade in wildlife parts and they have even punished one offender with death, he said.

The neighbouring country was also employing priests in its campaign for creating awareness about crime against wildlife.

"We had made the request a few months back and they acted without any delay," he said.

Mr Ghosh said the Dalai Lama's appeal to his followers to desist from trade in wildlife parts would also be very helpful in stopping the practice, as Tibet was one of the main centres of the trade, and the spiritual leader had a large following there, said Mr Ghosh.

The Dalai Lama, who has has been living in India since he fled Tibet after Chinese occupation of the region, has been working for environmental causes for many years.

Tibet has today become the world's leading market for tiger skins. It is understood that Tibetan skin trade and Chinese medicine have played a great part in pushing the demand, which has played havoc with the population of the endangered species.

Shops in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa are abundant in tiger skins and display it openly despite the international ban on the trade.

The link between the market for tiger skins in Tibet and poaching in India were first discovered in 2000, after the police seized a crate of skins being smuggled out of the country.

Humans Gave Big Cats Ulcers


By Ker Than
LiveScience Staff Writer
posted: 28 June 2006
07:57 am ET


Early humans living in Africa's open savannahs probably made easy pickings for large predatory cats, but a new study suggests that at least one of the meals didn't sit well.

A large cat dining on the entrails of one our early ancestors thousands of years ago contracted an ulcer-causing bacteria that spread to lions, cheetahs and tigers and which persists to this day, a new study concludes.

The strange finding will be detailed in an upcoming issue of the journal PLoS Genetics.

Too similar

Helicobacter pylori are bacteria that cause chronic stomach pains and ulcers in humans. Other animals, including non-human primates, are infected by other Helicobacter species that are only distantly related to H. pylori. The one exception is H. acinonychis, a microbe that infects large felines such as lions, tigers and cheetahs.

The microbes responsible for ulcers in humans and big cats are so similar that scientists speculated they were once one species. According to this theory, the microbe diverged after either a human ate a cat infected with the ulcer-causing bacteria or a cat ate an infected human.

To determine who or what ate whom, the researchers compared the genomes of the two bacteria species. They found that many of the inactive genes in H. acinonychis, the species that infects large cats, are more fragmented, or broken, than their still-functioning counterparts in H. pylori.

This strongly suggests that the direction of the host jump was from humans to cats, and not the other way around, the researchers say.

"It is very unlikely that such gene fragmentations could be restored to yield intact genes, which is what would have been necessary" if the bacteria jumped from cats to humans, said study team member Mark Achtman of the Max-Planck Institute in Germany.

The researchers think the host jump happened only once because many of the gene fragmentations are uniform among different strains of H. acinonychis.

Fighting to get sick

Based on similarities in the genomes of the two bacteria species, the researchers estimate that the host jump from humans to large cats took place about 200,000 years ago.

"The feline was probably a tiger, cheetah or lion but we don't know which," Achtman told LiveScience.

After the first cat was infected, the bacteria probably spread to other feline species during deadly fights for territory, explained another researcher on the project, Stephan Schuster of Pennsylvania State University.

"Behavior like this has been observed numerous times among the big cats in Africa," Schuster said.

Wild animal smugglers intercepted in Da Nang

Wild animal smugglers intercepted in Da Nang

11:41' 28/06/2006 (GMT+7) 

 

 

VietNamNet – Da Nang authorities on June 27 arrested a truck transporting hundreds of smuggled wild animals likely destined for illegal consumption in restaurants and other uses.

 

 

 

Anti-smuggling officers working with local police and smuggling control agents in Da Nang seized a truck owned by a tourism-service transport cooperative in HCM City carrying 179 turtles, 121kg of snakes, 47 iguanas and 60 teals.

 

 

 

According to the driver, the illicit cargo was bound for a purchaser in Binh Han Ward, northern Hai Duong Province.

 

 

 

The animals have been transferred to the Da Nang Forest Control Department and police are holding the driver, the purchaser and the truck for investigation.

 

 

 

Hai Chau

 

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/social/2006/06/585728/

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

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Tuesday, June 27, 2006

Half of California is Big Cat Territory

Officials say living with mountain lions is part of Bay Area life
By Simon Read, STAFF WRITER

The scenic beauty of the Bay Area means having to put up with more than just the high cost of real estate. It means occasionally sharing our living space with some of the area's original inhabitants.

Two East Bay neighborhoods have had recent brushes with the wild side. Since June 9, residents of the Rossmoor retirement community in Walnut Creek have reported seeing a mountain lion snooping around.

The surrounding area is home to many deer, a delicacy for mountain lions, officials said.

"You'll see mountain lions anywhere you see deer," said Steve Martarano, a spokesman with the California Department of Fish and Game. "That's their primary prey — that's why half the state is considered mountain lion habitat."

On June 13, a Fish and Game warden shot and killed a mountain lion in Pleasanton after it wandered into a residential area,

The shooting occurred On the 3900 block of Vine Street. Officers tried to scare the animal back into the hills, but to no avail. When it came within a few hundred yards of a park where children were at play, the animal was shot.

"Mountain lions are a protected species, but there are instances under the law where they can be killed," Martarano said. "Such action can be taken if it's a public safety issue, which is what happened in Pleasanton."

Nevertheless, it is extremely rare for mountain lions to attack people, he said. Since 1890, there have only been 15 recorded attacks in California. "People should be aware of mountain lions for sure," Martarano said, "but they shouldn't be paranoid or overly afraid."

If — by some chance — you encounter a mountain lion, there are some basic safety tips you should follow, officials said.

The Department of Fish and Game advises people to try and appear larger than they actually are. Raise your arms and open your jacket if you're wearing one.

Also, throw sticks and stones — or whatever you can get your hands on — without bending down or crouching.

"When you crouch down, it obviously makes you smaller," Martarano said. "You don't want the lion to think you're a small animal or a deer."

If you're with small children, pick them up so they don't turn and run, officials warn. Running may trigger a lion's chase instinct. Instead, walk backwards slowly and talk in a loud voice.

Finally, if you are attacked, fight back, officials said. A mountain lion will usually try to go for the head or neck, so try to remain upright.

"Attacks are extremely rare," Martarano said. "Mountain lions are pretty much afraid of people."

For more information, visit the Department of Fish and Game's Web site at
http://www.dfg.ca.gov.

Staff writer Simon Read can be reached at (925) 416-4849, or
sread@....



For the animals,
Laura Lluellyn-Lassiter

China bans use of tiger parts in traditional medicine

China bans use of tiger parts in traditional medicine

 

Special Correspondent

 

Indian tigers' parts find their way to China through Tibet 

 

NEW DELHI : China has banned the use of tiger parts in traditional medicine and made display or wearing of tiger parts an offence. Talking to reporters here on Tuesday, Union Environment and Forests Secretary Prodipto Ghosh said the Ministry had requested the Chinese Government to ban the use of animal parts in its medicines as it would discourage illegal smuggling to that country through Tibet.China has also made certain offences in this connection punishable with death penalty. The use of tiger parts in pharmaceutical drugs in China is already banned.

 

Importantly, Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama has also issued an appeal to his followers in Tibet not to indulge in the killing of tigers. Indian tigers' parts find their way to China through Tibet, where it is widely used for making traditional medicines and costumes. Mr. Ghosh said Tibet was also employing priests in its campaign for creating awareness about the crime against wildlife.

 

In India, a survey conducted on the status and changes of tigers in the 28 Tiger Reserves showed that Sariska (Rajasthan) and Indravati (Chhattisgarh) had a decline in forest cover as well as the number of big cats while the number had increased in three reserves and the status in the remaining was described as satisfactory.

 

"The report neither tells us that everything is hunky-dory nor does it say that the system has collapsed," Mr. Ghosh said. The survey was sent to the World Conservation Union (IUCN) for review. The comments of the IUCN experts have been included in the report.

 

http://www.hindu.com/2006/06/28/stories/2006062808901200.htm

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

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India says tigers are safe

New Delhi - An expert panel study of India’s 48 wildlife reserves, including 28 tiger sanctuaries, has found that the situation is not so alarming in most cases barring three tiger reserves where the big cat is not so safe.

 

Three tiger sanctuaries that are not well managed are Sariska in Rajasthan, Indravati in Chhattisgarh and Manas in Assam, Environment Secretary Prodipto Ghosh told the media here Tuesday.

 

On the other hand, based on 40 parameters set by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the expert panel has found some tiger sanctuaries to be well managed.

 

These include the Kanha in Madhya Pradesh, Periyar in Kerala, Nagarhole in Karnataka and Melghat in Maharashtra.

 

‘According to the international norms all is not alarming with our wildlife sanctuaries specially tiger reserves,’ said Ghosh.

 

The independent expert panel, endorsed by the Supreme Court to evaluate conditions of the country’s wildlife sanctuaries, in its report to the IUCN has revealed that while Indravati and Manas sanctuaries had witnessed a downslide in management due to law and order situation in the area, in the case of Sariska uncontrolled tourism, poaching and human settlements close to tiger habitat had resulted in the tiger population being wiped out.

 

Plans to reintroduce tigers in the Sariska reserve would have to wait till all the factors that endangered their lives in the first instance are addressed, said R.B. Lal, inspector general of forest (wildlife).

 

http://indiaenews.com/2006-06/12903-sanctuaries-including-sariska-not-tiger.htm

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

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This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.

 

Rare tortoise presumably sold for muti

Rare tortoise presumably sold for muti

 

Pietermaritzburg, South Africa 

 

 

 

26 June 2006 04:13

 

Six months after being convicted of the theft of a lion cub, a Cato Ridge man was charged in Pietermaritzburg on Monday with stealing an endangered 75-year-old giant Seychelles tortoise from the same complainant, the Natal Lion Park Zoo.

 

The zoo is near Cato Ridge, between Pietermaritzburg and Durban.

 

The accused, Nhlakanipho Eugene Ngcobo (29), was on Monday refused bail by Pietermaritzburg magistrate Brad Osborne, who said that it was clear that Ngcobo had some involvement in the theft or possession of the tortoise.

 

Ngcobo said during his bail application he had sold the tortoise but would plead not guilty to its theft. An alternative to the theft charge is possession of, or dealing in, or handling specially protected game reasonably suspected to have been unlawfully hunted or acquired.

 

Two of his co-accused were granted bail of R2 000 each on June 22 and a third was released on warning.

 

Two sangomas who allegedly bought the tortoise -- presumably to use as muti -- were granted bail of R2 000 each after being charged with dealing in or handling parts of an endangered tortoise.

 

Osborne said that one of the sangomas and some of Ngcobo's co-accused had agreed to testify that he was the main perpetrator of the theft of the tortoise. It weighed more than 100kg, was worth R35 000 and was carrying many eggs.

 

The sangomas, Sindisiwe Mkhize (47) and Bonisiwe Mhlongo (39), were arrested after putrid, maggot-infested, stinking tortoise viscera and eggs were found hanging from a tree in Imbali, Pietermaritzburg. Lion and leopard skins had also been found at the site. They appeared in court in colourful sangoma regalia.

 

The owner of the lion park, Brian Boswell, believed the tortoise was killed at the park. Blood had been found in the area.

 

Ngcobo told the court that he had previously worked at the lion park but had been fired for the theft of the lion cub. He was fined R1 000 (plus 30 days in jail suspended) in December 2005 by the Camperdown Magistrate's Court.

 

According to police, poaching has increased recently because there is a huge illegal trade in endangered species parts for the muti trade and game areas. Recently police seized ivory, rhino horn and several lion, leopard and antelope hides.

 

The Seychelles giant tortoise, once thought to be extinct, is a critically endangered species that can live to more than 100 years. In the Seychelles it is only bred in captivity. They grow so large and strong that children ride on them.

 

The case resumes on July 25. -- Sapa

 

http://www.mg.co.za/articlePage.aspx?articleid=275534&area=/breaking_news/breaking_news__national/

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

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This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.

 

Thursday, June 22, 2006

Tiger tax in India

 

Tiger tax in India

 

Listen to this story

 

A recent spate of poaching in India has hurt the country's tiger population. The government is considering a new solution that might hurt India's tourism industry too: a whopping tiger tax on hotels. Suzanne Marmion reports.

 

Photo: Stephen Jaffe © AFP/Getty Images

 

 

KAI RYSSDAL: The Indian government announced new ways to save that country's endangered tigers this week. It'll let the army shoot poachers on sight. Thankfully, that's not the whole plan. They'll increase conservation funds, with a whopping tiger tax on tourist hotels and parks. Suzanne Marmion traveled to India's best-known tiger preserve south of Delhi.

 

SUZANNE MARMION: It's just after dawn in Ranthambhore National Park. But the birds perched in the trees aren't singing. They're sending out urgent warnings.

 

Nearby, stalking through the undergrowth, a 400-pound tiger.

 

The animal's yellow eyes blaze over a bloody muzzle. It stands guard over breakfast — a deer, freshly killed.

 

Six years ago, former President Bill Clinton visited Ranthambhore. All the papers here reported that he'd caught a glimpse of a large male tiger named Bumbooram. It was famous for letting people come close. Since then, Bumbooram has been poached.

 

In fact, more than half the park's tigers have been killed over the past three years. Another reserve about 90 miles away called Sariska recently lost all its tigers. When that happened, the government convened a tiger task force. It was headed by environmentalist Sunita Narain.

SUNITA NARAIN: The conservationists who so strongly believe in the tiger must realize that all their efforts are failing.

Narain says the poached animals are taken mainly for use in Chinese medicines. She says it's time for a new approach to the problem that focuses less on tigers, and more on villagers.

 

Just outside Ranthambhore National Park, several village men sit on overturned buckets, relaxing and drinking tea. Across the street a 10-foot concrete wall keeps the men out of the park and the forests where they used to collect wood and graze their animals. That was before the government declared tigers a protected species, before dozens of luxury hotels were built to accommodate the tourists who come to see the animals.

 

[Voice of angry villager.]

 

This man is frustrated that he can't get a job at the hotels. He says he doesn't have the skills or education. He's angry at the tourist industry, and at the tiger. He says if poachers want to keep coming to kill the tigers, that's fine by him. Then, the villagers could go back to grazing their animals in the park.

NARAIN: The anger against the tiger is growing along every one of our tiger reserves.

Narain says it's not just that villagers tolerate the poachers. They sometimes cooperate with them. Some even engage in the trade themselves.

NARAIN: There are people who are feeling extremely angry, marginalized, frustrated at the fact that since the tiger has been protected, they have lost and not gained.

The people who have gained, according to Narain, are those who run the tourism industry at the parks. Together, the hotels in Ranthambhore make about $5 million a year. Narain says local resentment would subside if some of this money were redirected to the villages so they could benefit too.

 

So she and her task force have also proposed adding a 30 percent tax on top of what hotels already pay. Hotel owners say that would take away roughly half their profits.

GS RATHORE: I don't know what business sense that is.

Hotel investor GS Rathore says his family's business at Ranthambhore would be devastated by such a tax hike.

GS RATHORE: If that's the way the government sees it, if that's the way the government puts policy, it will close.

Rathore says the problem is the government puts the existing tax money into its general fund. He says if the politicians really want to save tigers, they should invest instead in guns for park rangers. Right now, India's rangers are often unarmed, the poachers are not.

 

India's parliament remains mired in this debate over guns-for-guards versus taxes-for-villagers. The government has accepted the task force's recommendations in principle, including the tiger tax, but it has taken no action.

 

While that gives some relief to hotel owners, the tourism industry faces another problem. In the last two seasons, with fewer tigers, there have been fewer tourists.

 

In Rajasthan, India, I'm Suzanne Marmion for Marketplace.

 

http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/2006/06/22/PM200606225.html

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2006

Trappers Capture Subdivision's Duck-Eating Bobcat

Trappers Capture Subdivision's Duck-Eating Bobcat

 

POSTED: 4:52 pm EDT June 19, 2006

UPDATED: 7:31 pm EDT June 19, 2006

 

ROCKLEDGE, Fla. -- A bobcat that has terrorized ducks in a Rockledge neighborhood for weeks has finally been caught.

 

The bobcat was on the prowl right in the midst of busy suburbia in a subdivision, WESH 2 News reported.

 

The cat has been preying ducks at Indian Oaks subdivision, and residents were worried it was going to start dining on their pets.

 

In fact, one man saw it carrying off a pet cat it had killed. In another nearby subdivision, parents recently said they were worried about their children walking to school in the morning with the cat in the area.

 

 

A company called Critter Control trapped the cat using live pigeons as bait in an enclosure where the bobcat was unable to get at the birds. Although the cat may have been there first in an area where the subdivisions are sprouting faster than weeds, the people have no intention of leaving.

 

So, it's the cat that has to go.

 

The trappers are taking him to Pine Island Wildlife Refuge on Merritt Island, not far away from where it was trapped and where there are other bobcats, but very few people.

 

It may be rare for Floridians to see bobcats, but according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, bobcats in Florida are neither rare nor endangered. A limited bobcat hunting season exists statewide.

 

They weigh less than 35 pounds and the average bobcat sticks to a territory of between five and six square miles.

 

They hunt at night tracking down rabbits, rats, and other small mammals along with small birds.

 

 

 To comment on this story, send an e-mail to Dan Billow.  dbillow@hearst.com

 

http://www.wesh.com/news/9393652/detail.html

 

For the cats,

 

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue

an Educational Sanctuary home

to more than 100 big cats

12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625

813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition here:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/344896451?ltl=1140270431

 

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.