Wednesday, March 03, 2010

eNews from Northern Jaguar Project (March 2010)

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Northern Jaguar Project

Dear Friends ,

As we continue to celebrate ongoing accomplishments at the Northern Jaguar Reserve, the Northern Jaguar Project (NJP) has put together this occasional electronic update to share developments from the world’s northernmost breeding jaguar population with you, our supporters. Here we’ll be able to keep you better informed with the most current jaguar news and photographs from the reserve and surrounding community. Be sure to read the entire jaguar guardians blog and stay tuned for their next tale of adventure in the weeks ahead. We couldn't do any of this without your support, which is very much appreciated. Thank you!

For the jaguar,

Diana
Diana Hadley
NJP President

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Jaguar Guardians Blog - January 2010

By Carmina Gutiérrez and Miguel Gómez Ramírez, Jaguar Guardians

We are very happy because we have the opportunity once again to tell you about the good results from the efforts that we are undertaking to preserve the jaguar in this region of North America. Like each month, we had a lot of work and, of course, many adventures on the Northern Jaguar Reserve.

We finished 2009 in a good way, and we started the new year even better! After nearly three months without a picture of a jaguar, this time we got five photos of jaguars on the Northern Jaguar Reserve. The Feline Photo Project obtained three more jaguar photos on the neighboring ranches.

Our most famous jaguar, the male nicknamed “Perrito,” was photographed once again at the boundary where Los Pavos and Dubaral meet. He has been seen several times in this area. On the night of December 6, a motion-triggered camera that we installed just six hours earlier took a photograph of Perrito! Almost a month later, he was photographed on two consecutive days: first at Dubaral toward the northern end of the reserve; the next day at Rancho El Carricito, the neighboring ranch owned by our friend Dolores “La Lola” Lopez. This was good news for La Lola because she lost her burros to predation last year and will now be rewarded for the jaguar picture.

In the middle of December, the female jaguar named “Cholla” was photographed twice at Dubaral. Cholla was seen again by our cameras in late December at El Carricito, which means more rewards for La Lola! (Cholla is the jaguar recorded last year dragging a javelina.) In the recent photos, you can see that she has a big tummy. Is Cholla pregnant right now? If so, maybe she is pregnant by Perrito. Read more…

Photo of Perrito at Dubaral on the Northern Jaguar Reserve


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Help Us Name Two New Jaguars at the Reserve

Help Us Name Two New Jaguars at the Reserve

Last summer we asked for your suggestions in naming the newest jaguar spotted on the reserve. Your input was passed along to field staff who voted on their favorite name for our newest female jaguar: “Cholla.” In late December, another previously unidentified jaguar walked in front of our cameras, so the jaguar guardians returned to the pool of names submitted by NJP supporters. For this adult male, they selected the name “Mayo.”

Thanks to Judy Tipton and Joan Clark for helping us name these reserve jaguars. We encourage you to also send us your name ideas – what do you think any future jaguars should be called? Please let us know.

Just this morning, the guardians returned to town from the reserve with photos of two brand new jaguars!! So your input is needed right away for these currently nameless cats. Please email us with what you think the best names are for these newest jaguars! Many thanks!

Photo of Mayo at Los Pavos on the Northern Jaguar Reserve


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Reserve Infrastructure Improvements Underway

Reserve Infrastructure Improvements Underway

Thanks to the generous support we've received, NJP has recently begun to initiate infrastructure upgrades, including water system improvements, security measures, and a basic communications system at the Northern Jaguar Reserve. Naturalia, our Mexican partner with whom we co-manage the reserve, oversees the construction.

So far, we have upgraded the entire water system at the reserve headquarters at La Ventana with an electric pump, gravity-flow water tank, wood-fueled water heater, water filters, and outdoor kitchen/bathroom sinks and a shower. Laco, our resident vaquero, hand-built the shower walls using local river rocks, and the sinks were constructed with salvaged materials. Greywater goes to a small garden that will provide chiltepines and other local foods for Laco and his family. We also installed a composting toilet to make prolonged stays more comfortable and sanitary.

To discourage trespassing and theft, we put in a security gate at the reserve entrance and created a secure room at La Ventana so that research equipment, cameras, and work tools can be safely stored. We are now planning improvements to the house to include solar panels that will power a refrigerator, as well as lights and computers for a few hours a day.

A radio repeater will soon be positioned to allow us the first stages of radio communications from La Ventana to the nearest town of Sahuaripa, as well as to keep us in touch with the guardians in their vehicle and, with some limitations, while hiking.


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Jaguar Bike-a-thon Rolls through Arizona

Jaguar Bike-a-thon Rolls through Arizona

Southern Arizona, April 15 to 22

A project of the Jaguar Habitat Campaign, the upcoming Jaguar Bike-a-thon will be an eight-day, 300-mile bike ride starting near the U.S.-Mexico border and ending in Phoenix with an Earth Day rally. Along the way, riders will spread the word about jaguar conservation through evening presentations, circulating a citizens’ statement of support for recovering the jaguar, and participation in Tucson’s annual All Species Parade.

NJP staff will be participating in the ride, and we’re looking for other cyclists concerned about the future of the jaguar to join us. You can ride in the bike-a-thon for the entire route or any segment of it. Other ways to help include driving a support vehicle, helping at events or with housing, or by making a donation to support the ride.

More details can be found on the Jaguar Habitat Campaign website, where you can register to participate and also sign the jaguar statement of support.

Artwork by Jeff Collins


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Remembering Macho B One Year Later

Remembering Macho B One Year Later

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the tragic death of Arizona’s last known wild jaguar, “Macho B.” The loss of Macho B deeply saddens our supporters still and leaves the hope for jaguar recovery in the U.S. dependent on the survival of the breeding jaguar population in and near the Northern Jaguar Reserve.

As this small Sonoran population struggles to avoid extinction, NJP is dedicated to ensuring their protection and expanding the safe zone in which they can roam.

Photo of jaguar tracks at the Northern Jaguar Reserve by Jim Rorabaugh


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Become a Recurring NJP Donor

Become a Recurring NJP Donor

Our work to protect the world’s northernmost jaguar population is continuous and ongoing, and we really value your support of our jaguar conservation efforts. One way you can help is to join a special group of supporters who make monthly gifts to provide dependable funding for NJP. By donating online , you can opt to have your gift automatically charged to your credit card each month.

You can also elect to designate your contribution to NJP’s Stewardship and Long-term Management Fund – a wonderful way to guarantee protection for the reserve and all of its residents by securing a permanent annual source of funding. Learn more here...

Photo of the Rio Aros by Matt Skroch


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Image of the Month

Ocelot at Los Pavos on the Northern Jaguar Reserve

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http://www.northernjaguarproject.org

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Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://www.bigcatrescue.org

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